menu icon
search icon button

Brains & Neurons

Many have compared the Internet to the connections in the human brain. Looking at these sites allows students to see how much more complex and wonderful our brain really is.

larger image of http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html

image of http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html

Neuroscience For Kids

Neuroscience For Kids is so successful that several other sites link to it as the primary source on this topic. Explanations for the aroma of flowers and the pain, associated with stepping on a nail, also add a note of realism for students. Students can query experts and receive a topical newsletter with their e-mail.

Why Do We Yawn?

What makes yawning so contagious? To get more oxygen? To cool the brain down?!?! Why are yawns contagious? Why do some groups yawn less?

The Yawn-O-Meter  video makes a great introduction -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJXX4vF6Zh0

YouTube URL
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0dQx4SNSwE
larger image of http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/chems.html

image of http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/chems.html

Olfactory System

The neuroscience project at Washington University has developed a special study of the olfactory system. The site is graphically appealing and utilizes some new technology tools such as email to experts, a search engine and a survey.

larger image of http://www.exploratorium.edu/memory/

image of http://www.exploratorium.edu/memory/

The Memory Exhibition - The Exploratorium

The Exploratorium's Memory Exhibition duplicates much of their original exhibition. It will be appealing to students because "hairdos" illustrate changes in perception (among other visual effects).

How do dogs "see" with their noses

In this TED Ed video, Alexandra Horowitz illustrates how the dog's nose can smell the past, the future and even things that can't be seen at all. You may have heard the expression that dogs 'see with their noses.' But these creature's amazing nasal architecture actually reveals a whole world beyond what we can see.

YouTube URL
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7fXa2Occ_U
larger image of http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/neuron/

image of http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/neuron/

NeurOn (Neurolab Online) - NASA

NASA's biology sites include NeurOn (Neurolab Online), a study of neural systems in microgravity. Students can analyze the data and e-mail questions to the more than 100 scientists who are participating. Background links are available, too.

larger image of http://www.med.harvard.edu/AANLIB/

image of http://www.med.harvard.edu/AANLIB/

The Whole Brain - Harvard Medical School

Cross-sectional slides of every part of the brain has been placed online at Harvard Medical School (for advanced students).

larger image of http://brainmuseum.org/

image of http://brainmuseum.org/

Brain Museum

A huge collection of cross-sectional slides of the brain (more than 100 species) has been cataloged at the Brain Museum, co-sponsored by the University of Wisconsin, Michigan State, and NSF (among others). This is an exceptional online resource for school students.

larger image of https://www.brainpop.com/

image of https://www.brainpop.com/

BrainPOP

BrainPOP is a commercial site but an especially engaging one--movies, experiments, etc. about blood, cells, hair. It is suitable for ages 6-14 but it does include sensitive topics about diseases like cancer.

larger image of http://www.cbn-atl.org/education/activities.shtml

image of http://www.cbn-atl.org/education/activities.shtml

Center for Behavioral Neuroscience

The Center for Behavioral Neuroscience educators work with teachers and scientists to develop neuroscience lessons and activities for K-12 students, including the Build-A-Brain classroom activity!

larger image of http://www.manateebrain.org

image of http://www.manateebrain.org

Manatee

Students can compare the form and functions of various marine, mammalian brains at Manatee. Quite interesting.

Related Topics ...

Home | Search | The Forum | Videos | What's New | Table of Contents | Sign In

Ideas and inspiration for the K-12 community.

© 1996 - 2016 Dr. Bonnie Tenenbaum -- coding and hosting by Lodestone Systems