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Chemistry Experiments

larger image of http://www.ciese.org/curriculum/boilproj/

image of http://www.ciese.org/curriculum/boilproj/

Boiling Point Project

Similarly, the Boiling Point lesson calls for students around the world to record the boiling point of water.

Since water does boil at remarkably different temperatures, depending upon the elevation, students collect authentic data.

While the outcomes of this experiment hold no mystery, it illustrates the true power of the Web--gathering, compiling and analyzing data at points to which students would have no other access.

An international version is also available.

larger image of https://www.exploratorium.edu/snacks/subject/chemistry

image of https://www.exploratorium.edu/snacks/subject/chemistry

Exploratorium Chemistry Snacks

The Exploratorium in San Francisco has a number of Chemistry mini-experiments, from creating giant bubbles [our web master's favorite] to using your skin and two different metals create a battery. This site explains the why as well as the how of these experiments.

larger image of https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/spacecraft-materials-and-the-chemistry-of-space-exploration/

image of https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/spacecraft-materials-and-the-chemistry-of-space-exploration/

Spacecraft Materials and the Chemistry of Space Exploration

In this lab activity from NASA, students will become materials scientists for a day. Designing a satellite or a rover means understanding the properties of metals under conditions very unlike those on Earth. Which material should we use to construct a rover going to a planet like Venus? What if we were traveling to an icy planet or even underwater?

The chemistry lab or demonstartion can be used in grades 2-12. It includes a student worksheet for older students as well as the answer key.

larger image of https://learning-center.homesciencetools.com/article/crystal-growing-science/

image of https://learning-center.homesciencetools.com/article/crystal-growing-science/

Crystal Growing Science: 5 Ways to Grow Crystals

This resource looks at what are crystals and how do they form?

A crystal is a solid material with atoms and molecules that are arranged in a consistent repeating pattern. Crystals can be expensive and beautiful, like amethysts or diamonds. Or they can be found in your kitchen in the form of sugar and salt. Your class can easily grow crystals by adding a crystal-forming chemical to water and waiting for the water to cool or evaporate.

You'll find five different methods for how to grow crystals. Science experiments with instructions are provided for each.

larger image of http://scifun.org/

image of http://scifun.org/

Science is Fun - University of Wisconsin

An ingenious professor at the University of Wisconsin has created the Science is Fun site at which a different topic is explored in-depth each week during the school year.

It is well-illustrated.

For example, most of us know that changes in pigmentation result in the beautiful fall color displays.

Most of us do not know the actual details of the chemical reactions.

This site would be especially apt for your students who are persistent in their questions to get to the bottom of things.

larger image of http://chem.lapeer.org/

image of http://chem.lapeer.org/

Science Teachers' Resource Center

Check out the Science Teachers' Resource Center at Lapeer School for directions about some innovative as well as traditional experiments.

They will welcome your successful experiments here.

larger image of http://www.TheCatalyst.org

image of http://www.TheCatalyst.org

The Catalyst

The Catalyst is an online journal for high school chemistry teachers.

larger image of http://www.shodor.org/succeed-1.0/forensic/

image of http://www.shodor.org/succeed-1.0/forensic/

Forensic Science - Shodor

Shodor showcases forensic science, certainly a popular draw on television today.

larger image of https://www.nsta.org/search.aspx?q=chemistry

image of https://www.nsta.org/search.aspx?q=chemistry

NSTA Search

For tips implementing inquiry-based lessons in chemistry look at NSTA resources.

The Boiling Point experiment exemplifies a best use of the Web.

Other projects have attempted similar tasks; for instance, one experiment asks students around the world to measure carbon dioxide in the air.

Since most worldwide connected schools are in urban areas, it turns out that the amount of carbon dioxide does not vary much.

Major cities, however, are located at different elevations so The Boiling Point experiment works.


What other chemistry experiments would provide a similar learning experience?.

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