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Evaluating the Quality of Information on the Internet

With the reliance of students, teachers, business people ... well, everyone ... on the Internet and its resources, it's imperative that everyone has the tools needed to evaluate and identify good and bad sites.

Use the resources and challenges outlined here to equip students to become savvy consumers of net information. Check out fake sites or sites with an obvious bias to introduce students to this concept.

larger image of https://docs.google.com/document/d/1m7lYsmLWIRyu8oJXD1nCcNoDDmRizeiFmyoAB38-d2s/preview

image of https://docs.google.com/document/d/1m7lYsmLWIRyu8oJXD1nCcNoDDmRizeiFmyoAB38-d2s/preview

Believe It or Not?: A Web Search Lesson Plan

Google has created a slide show and lesson plan to help students use critical thinking skills to assess the credibility of search page results. The goal is to provide students with validating strategies to make an initial judgment about the authority of web based information.

larger image of http://www.philb.com/fakesites.htm

image of http://www.philb.com/fakesites.htm

Fake And Spoof Websites

Librarians and educators need to be able to illustrate to students and users alike that websites cannot always be trusted to provide truthful and accurate data. This page provides examples of websites that are full of lies, inaccuracies or false information - either for amusement or for more worrying reasons.

Everything from Dihydrogen Monoxide (water) to the California Velcro Crop Failure and The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus.

larger image of http://guides.lib.berkeley.edu/evaluating-resources

image of http://guides.lib.berkeley.edu/evaluating-resources

Evaluating Resources

The U.C. Berkeley Library has developed a methodology for evaluating the quality of resources and evaluate their authority and appropriateness for your project.

Useful for both students and teachers – anyone doing research on the Internet.

larger image of http://mason.gmu.edu/~montecin/web-eval-sites.htm

image of http://mason.gmu.edu/~montecin/web-eval-sites.htm

Criteria to Evaluate the Credibility of WWW Resources

Anyone, in theory, can publish on the Web. Therefore, it is imperative for students to develop a critical eye to evaluate the credibility of Internet information.

Virginia Montecino from George Mason University proposes 9 questions that can help your students evaluate is credibility of a page's information.

larger image of https://www.admongo.gov/

image of https://www.admongo.gov/

Admongo

Admongo is a free resource from the FTC that teaches critical thinking with an application to advertisements.

If is sounds to good to be true...

larger image of http://www.emich.edu/ift/mod2/index.php

image of http://www.emich.edu/ift/mod2/index.php

Web Site Evaluation

Eastern Michigan University provides an in-depth lesson series that can be adapted to your students needs. They compare looking on the Internet for information to shopping for food, clothes, or a car. Includes a section on e-mail hoaxes and practice evaluating hoax web sites.

When in doubt, Google it.

A technique our webmaster uses to evaluate a product or web site is to run it thru Google search. Enter the name of the concept, item (e.g., Yugo Car), or web domain into Google and see what comes up. If 20 of the first 50 entries talk about removing spyware or include words like hoax, worst, or dangerous ... you get the idea.

As teachers, you will have already developed a sense of quality sites. Your students need to acquire similar experience thru practice and examples.

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