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World Population Growth

In 1999, the world population reached 6 billion people. We are now over 7 billion and expected to reach 8 billion in 2024.

World population growth and its impact

A teen boy introduces a video showing why the world's population has changed so rapidly in the last few hundred years using glass tubes and colored water. A great introduction to the subject.

YouTube URL
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NNSjILj2DFs
larger image of http://www.census.gov/popclock/

image of http://www.census.gov/popclock/

POPClock - U.S. Census Bureau

An interesting page is the "POPClock" from the U.S. Census Bureau. As soon as the site is entered, a population ticker is activated; it just keeps going and going...

Let it run for 24 hours and compare the change. Relate that to the number of houses, cars or school buildings that have to be built each day just to keep up.

larger image of http://serc.carleton.edu/sp/library/simulations/examples/36428.html

image of http://serc.carleton.edu/sp/library/simulations/examples/36428.html

Population Simulator

This free, on-line simulator uses United Nations world population projections to simulate future population trends for the whole world or individual countries. Students can make their own simulations by adjusting fertility, life expectancy, and the male-female ratio at birth. The link to the simulator itself can be found about half way down the page.

Population Growth & The Chesapeake Bay

Geographer Peter Claggett with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) show how the population of the the Chesapeake Bay has grown using satellite imagery and talks about what people are doing to lessen the impact of a growing population on the region's natural resources.

YouTube URL
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XgD-QCGqQHE
larger image of http://neo.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/view.php?datasetId=SEDAC_POP

image of http://neo.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/view.php?datasetId=SEDAC_POP

Population Density

Understanding how human population is spread out across the Earth's surface is an important part of many types of research, and it is especially important for studying the planet's supply of and human demand for natural resources like freshwater, forest products, or good farmland.

NASA has created a map broken up into grids showing number of people per square kilometer. The most densely populated areas are bright red; these include large cities all over the world. Another obvious population pattern is the big difference in population between Earth's most populated countries — China and India — and other countries.

It is surprising how much of the earth's surface still has less than 1 person per square kilometer.

larger image of http://www.censusscope.org/

image of http://www.censusscope.org/

Census Scope

Information from the decennial U.S. census are available at Census Scope. The results of demographic trends can be compared between 2010 and 2000. The data is broken down by a number of categories, including race, age, growth and major industry.

larger image of http://www.census.gov/2010census/popmap/

image of http://www.census.gov/2010census/popmap/

2010 Census Interactive Population Map

This map allows you to zoom in on 2010 census data down to the neighborhood level.

Taking into account the world's population size and distribution is vital for most environmental studies.

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