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Black (African-American) History

February is traditionally "Black History Month". Many web sites have been created to help convey information on the contributions and experiences of African Americans to the classroom.

One of the best sites is Patchwork of African-American Life, identifying ways to integrate the World Wide Web and videoconferencing into this classroom topic. An Interactive Treasure Hunt, Web Quests and more can all be found at this excellent web site.

A STUNNING exhibit on the African American experience in American history -- African American Odyssey -- has been created by the Library of Congress. It is divided into 9 sections: Slavery, Free Blacks, Abolition, The Civil War, Reconstruction, Booker T. Washington, World I, New Deal and WWII, and Civil Rights.

The Digital History project, supported by the University of Houston,devotes special attention to U.S. history and African-American memories. The site also has an ask-the-historian capacity.

Black History Hotlist provides a wide range of Internet resources.

The Library of Congress has compiled a collection of slave narratives. Students will do less stereotyping if they can contrast different experiences.

In celebration of the 40th anniversary of Freedom Summer Education and Democracy contains dozens of primary source documents (downloadable)to empower African Americans in Mississippi to become agents of social change. The summer of 1964 changed the struggle for civil rights forever.

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Plantation Letters

This collection of primary sources will help students learn summarizing, contextualizing, inferring, monitoring and corrobation. Students are often asked to make inferencees without actually studying the skill.This model is called SCIM-C.

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