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Earthquakes and Oceans

Earthquakes for Kids is part of an extensive set of resources for students and teachers.

The National Earthquake Information Center displays real time maps of earthquake epicenters in the U.S. and world wide. Did You Feel It allows those in earthquake areas to help scientists identify the strength and reach of recent earthquakes.

Crustal is a Java-developed site. It includes first-hand accounts of earthquakes by classic writers and animations of each stage in an earthquake. The animations give an earthquake a "happening" flavor and clarify the process probably better than still images would.

The impact of the San Francisco earthquake in 1906 was the first national disaster of its scope recorded through photography. Compare this to images of modern earthquakes in California.

The Ocean Science Education Institute illustrates the link between two powerful natural forces, earthquakes and tsunamis.

larger image of http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learn/kids/larger image of http://earthquake.usgs.gov/larger image of http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/dyfi/larger image of http://projects.crustal.ucsb.edu/understanding/larger image of http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/sf-earthquake-and-fire/larger image of http://pubs.usgs.gov/dds/dds-29/larger image of http://www.cosee-ne.net

These sites represent exotic treks on which most students would never embark except via telecommunications. Other resources in this library can be accessed for further research.

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