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Scientists and Mathematicians Online

larger image of http://mathforum.org/dr.math/

image of http://mathforum.org/dr.math/

Ask Dr.Math

The Math Forum at Drexel University enjoys an excellent reputation. Not only are their lessons sound but the site was designed for online access so it is interesting and easy to use. Dr. Math provides clear explanations; students can search the archives or email a new math conundrum.

larger image of http://www.madsci.org/

image of http://www.madsci.org/

Mad Scientist Network

The Mad Scientist Network at Washington University in St.Louis is maintained by graduate and medical students. Questions from more than 20 different fields can be submitted to 200 scientists or so. Links and archives of past questions are available, too. The site managers have a good sense of humor.

larger image of http://www.eskimo.com/~billb/

image of http://www.eskimo.com/~billb/

Science Hobbyist

Bill Beaty has a wide ranging collection of science projects and observations, everything from "safe" high voltage generators to highway traffic "waves" (how car traffic behaves like a fluid) to Science Fair ideas.

larger image of http://www.refdesk.com

image of http://www.refdesk.com

RefDesk

RefDesk lists experts in science from A-Z--birds, bugs, chemistry what-have-you. At times it appears that an expert site was identified and a question devised rather than vice verse. You can meet several Dr.Sciences. This collection is still a more manageable approach than using most search engines.

larger image of https://askdruniverse.wsu.edu/

image of https://askdruniverse.wsu.edu/

Ask DrUniverse

Ask Dr. Universe will answer questions like "Why don't spiders stick to their own webs?" and "Do frogs sleep?"

larger image of http://askabiologist.asu.edu/

image of http://askabiologist.asu.edu/

Ask A biologist

Ask a Biologist looks at all things biological, from Parts of the Cell and The Nervous System to How Animals See Color and Viral Attack.

This approach facilitates exchanges among colleagues for general planning. That is, certain topics will be tackled but the schedule and precision are not well-defined. Access to a bank is handy as specific topics and queries arise serendipitously. It is best to seek an expert primarily for unusual questions to conserve this resource for special occasions.

The UCI site offers an excellent set of guidelines for building productive relationships with online experts.

See also entries, Project Experts and Mentor Networks.

larger image of http://www.aaas.org/programs/education-programs

image of http://www.aaas.org/programs/education-programs

American Association for the Advancement of Science

AAAS provides a wide range of resources, from STEM volunteers to hundreds of standards based lesson plans to films and publications.

Many web sites post expert articles. Some even answer submitted questions. Here's a sample of what's out there.

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Ideas and inspiration for the K-12 community.

© 1996 - 2016 Dr. Bonnie Tenenbaum -- coding and hosting by Lodestone Systems